Simply put, eating the rainbow involves eating fruits and vegetables of different colors every day.
Plants contain different pigments, or phytonutrients, which give them their color. Different-colored plants are linked to higher levels of specific nutrients and health benefits.
While eating more vegetables and fruit is always a good idea, focusing on eating a variety of colors will increase your intake of different nutrients to benefit various areas of your health.
While there are many purported benefits of phytonutrients, it’s difficult to perform randomized controlled trials — the most rigorous type of research — to prove their efficacy. As such, most research is based on population-level intakes and disease risk.

That said, almost all studies show benefits from regularly eating colorful fruits and vegetables with virtually no downsides. By getting a variety of color in your diet, you’re giving your body an array of vitamins, minerals, and phytochemicals to benefit your health.

SUMMARY
To eat the rainbow, be sure to eat a variety of different-colored fruits and vegetables throughout your day. Most colorful fruits and veggies have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects that may benefit different aspects of your health.

The colors
Each color represents a different phytochemical and set of nutrients that may benefit your health.
The following sections go into more detail regarding sample foods, their main phytonutrients, vitamins, and minerals, as well as the benefits of each color category
Note that when it comes to vitamins and minerals, levels can vary for each vegetable or fruit.

Red

Fruits and veggies
* tomatoes
* tomato paste
* tomato sauce
* watermelon
* pink guava
* grapefruit
*

Main phytonutrients
* lycopene (from the vitamin A family)

Main vitamins and minerals
* folate
* potassium
* vitamin A (lycopene)
* vitamin C
* vitamin K1

Health benefits
* anti-inflammatory
* antioxidant
* may benefit heart health
* may reduce sun-related skin damage
* may lower your risk of certain cancers

Orange and yellow

Fruits and veggies
* carrots
* sweet potatoes
* yellow peppers
* bananas
* pineapple
* tangerines
* pumpkin
* winter squash
* corn
*
Main phytonutrients
* carotenoids (e.g., beta carotene, alpha carotene, beta cryptoxanthin), which belong to the vitamin A family

Main vitamins and minerals
* fiber
* folate
* potassium
* vitamin A (beta carotene)
* vitamin C

Health benefits
* anti-inflammatory
* antioxidant
* may benefit heart health
* supports eye health
* may lower your risk of cancer

Green

Fruits and veggies
* spinach
* kale
* broccoli
* avocados
* asparagus
* green cabbage
* Brussels sprouts
* green herbs

Main phytonutrients
* Leafy greens: chlorophyll and carotenoids
* Cruciferous greens (e.g., broccoli, cabbage): indoles, isothiocyanates, glucosinolates

Main vitamins and minerals
* fiber
* folate
* magnesium
* potassium
* vitamin A (beta carotene)
* vitamin K1

Health benefits
* anti-inflammatory
* antioxidant
* cruciferous veggies, in particular, may lower your risk of cancer and heart disease

Blue and purple

Fruits and veggies
* blueberries
* blackberries
* Concord grapes
* red/purple cabbage
* eggplant
* plums
* elderberries

Main phytonutrients
* anthocyanins

Main vitamins and minerals
* fiber
* manganese
* potassium
* vitamin B6
* vitamin C
* vitamin K1

Health benefits
* anti-inflammatory
* antioxidant
* may benefit heart health
* may lower your risk of neurological disorders
* may improve brain function
* may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes
* may lower your risk of certain cancers

Dark red

Fruits and veggies
* beets
* prickly pears

Main phytonutrients
* betalains

Main vitamins and minerals
* fiber
* folate
* magnesium
* manganese
* potassium
* vitamin B6

Health benefits
* anti-inflammatory
* antioxidant
* may lower your risk of high blood pressure
* may benefit heart health
* may lower your risk of certain cancers
* may support athletic performance through increased oxygen uptake

White and brown

Fruits and veggies
* cauliflower
* garlic
* leeks
* onions
* mushrooms
* daikon radish
* parsnips
* white potatoes

Main phytonutrients
* anthoxanthins (flavonols, flavones), allicin

Main vitamins and minerals
* fiber
* folate
* magnesium
* manganese
* potassium
* vitamin B6
* vitamin K1

Health benefits
* anti-inflammatory
* antioxidant
* may lower your risk of colon and other cancers
* may benefit heart health

SUMMARY
Each color represents a different phytochemical and set of nutrients that may benefit your health.

How to do it
The great thing about eating the rainbow is it’s easy to implement.
To eat the rainbow, try to incorporate two to three different-colored fruits or vegetables at every meal and at least one at every snack. While you don’t have to eat every single color every day, try to get them into your diet a few times per week. Here are some ideas:

Breakfast
* an omelet with spinach, mushrooms, and orange bell peppers
* a smoothie with mango, banana, and dragonfruit
* a Greek yogurt bowl with blueberries, kiwi, and strawberries
* a breakfast egg sandwich with tomato, leafy greens, and avocado

Lunch or dinner
* a mixed salad with green cabbage, lettuce, apple, shredded carrots, red pepper, cucumbers, and cherry tomatoes paired with a protein source (e.g., kidney beans, chickpeas, grilled chicken, salmon)
* chicken with roasted sweet potatoes, Brussels sprouts, and garlic
* homemade soup with canned tomatoes, onion, garlic, chopped carrots, white potatoes or parsnip, and kale
* a goat cheese salad with pickled beets, arugula, avocado, and pecans
* spaghetti with tomato sauce, mushrooms, and zucchini

Snacks
* an apple with peanut butter
* red pepper slices with hummus
* grapes and cheese
* a green smoothie or juice
* a banana
* blueberries and yogurt
* broccoli, carrots, and dip
* dried mango slices
* 4–5 longan or lychee fruit
* edamame pods
* celery and melted cheese

The opportunities to include fruits and vegetables into your diet are endless. If you live in an area without fresh produce year-round, try purchasing frozen fruits and vegetables for some meals. They’re equally nutritious, accessible, and affordable.

SUMMARY
Try to eat two to three different-colored fruits or vegetables at every meal, as well as one to two at every snack.

The bottom line
Remembering to eat the rainbow every day is a great and simple way to make sure you’re getting a variety of nutrients into your diet.
Fruits and vegetables of different colors confer various health benefits. By ensuring you’re eating a few colored fruits or vegetables at each meal, you’re setting yourself up for good health.
To try eating the rainbow, work toward adding at least two or three colored fruits or vegetables to each meal and at least one or two to each snack.

Checkout our top yummy rainbow combos below for the week.

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Raspberry protein cakes topped with berries and pink roses

Ingredients: 1 cup rolled oats (ground-put them first in the blender so they become flour) 1 cup milk (I used almond milk) 1 large banana 2 eggs (for a vegan option use flax eggs) 1/2 teaspoon vanilla powder (optional-skip if you don't have vanilla-difference is not noticeable) Blend all the ingredients in a blender. Cook in a pan using pancake rings or just small pan after brushing it with a bit of coconut oil (or your favourite oil). Top the pancakes with your favourite berries , edible roses ( try Shops like Gourmet Sweet Botanicals, Marx Foods, and Melissa's who will ship to you overnight so they're as fresh as possible) and favourite sweetener.

Source: @alphafoodie

Corn on the cob ribs

Ingredients 2 corn on cob 1 tbsp olive oil or another oil, like avocado oil 1/2 tsp salt 1/2 tsp garlic powder 1/2 tsp paprika smoked 1/4 tsp pepper 1/4 tsp onion powder optional Instructions Step 1: Chop the corn in riblets * I've tried various methods for this and found the best way to cut the corn is to stand it up vertically with the wider part against the table, and chop in half, then chop those halves into quarters.

Doing it vertically removes the risk of squashing any of the kernels and it rolling away as you chop.

If you're nervous, then I suggest chopping the cob in half, so you'll end up with 8 pieces per cob. The cob being shorter to cut through means more leverage on the counter surface and less risk of accidents.
 Step 2: Season them * Prepare the seasoning by combining all of the spices and oil in a small bowl and mixing well.

Then brush the seasoning over the chopped corn.
 Step 3: Cook the corn ribs * Air Fryer Corn Ribs * Lay the corn ribs in a single layer in your air fryer basket, with a little space between each so the air can flow.
 * Cook the corn in an Air Fryer at 375ºF/190ºC for 12-15 minutes, optionally flipping them over at 7 minutes. If you prefer crispier results, then cook for the longest time (I did 15).
 Oven-Baked Corn Ribs * Lay the seasoned corn on a parchment-lined baking tray and bake in a preheated oven at 375ºF/190ºC for between 25-30 minutes.
 * The oven-baked corn doesn't curl as quickly/easily as air-fried- this is normal. You may want to increase the time slightly if you want them super crispy and curly.
 Shallow Fried Corn Ribs * If you plan to fry the corn, then don't season them first – add the plain chopped corn to the oil.

Add around 1cm (or 1/2-inch) of cooking oil to a wide, thick-bottomed pan/wok.
 * When the oil begins to smoke, add the corn ribs, occasionally turning until the ribs are crispy, golden, and curled up.
 * Remove the corn riblets carefully from the oil and lay them on kitchen paper to drain. I like to use a second piece to blot the top of the corn too.
 * Then gently toss the corn with the dry seasoning mixture (no oil required).
 Step 4: Prepare the garnishes & Serve * Meanwhile, as the sweetcorn cooks, prepare the chili mayo and garnishes. Once baked, top and serve! Notes * Be careful chopping the corn: this CAN be dangerous, and the last thing we all need during a pandemic is a trip to A&E/ER. If you’re nervous about it, then skip this one- don’t worry, the whole corn on the cob will taste just as good with the same seasonings! Alternatively, chop the cobs in half first – the ‘shorter’ pieces will be easier to chop while standing vertical on the surface.  * In-season corn will taste far superior. Though, you could buy whole corn cobs frozen and allow them to thaw before chopping. Nutrition Serving: 4riblets | Calories: 145kcal | Carbohydrates: 18g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 8g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Trans Fat: 1g | Sodium: 596mg | Potassium: 269mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 6g | Vitamin A: 416IU | Vitamin C: 6mg | Calcium: 6mg | Iron: 1mg

Source: @alphafoodie; Www.Cornonthecob.com

Cherry roasted tomato pasta

Ingredients 1.25 cup roasted tomato pasta sauce 8 ounces pasta of your choice, GF, vegan, etc. Instructions * Make the tomato pasta sauce according to these instructions – This can be made fresh or in advance and stored in the fridge/freezer.
 * Add the sauce to a saucepan to heat up (and optionally reduce slightly). Depending on if you want to adapt the recipe in any way, you may want to saute some veg first or add extra ingredients to the sauce at this point while it simmers.
 * Meanwhile, boil your pasta of choice in a pan of liberally salted water (or vegetable stock). * Drain the pasta leaving some of the starchy water behind, just enough to coat the pasta. It will help the sauce to adhere. The rest of the pasta water can be saved (read notes below).
 * Mix the cooked pasta into the heated tomato pasta sauce and then serve, garnished with your toppings of choice! How To Store * Any prepared cherry tomato pasta can be allowed to cool slightly then stored in an airtight container for 3-4 days. Reheat in the microwave or stovetop – you may need a splash of water or vegetable stock to bring it back to the same creamy consistency.

You can also freeze the mixed tomato pasta dish for up to 2 months. Allow it to thaw in the refrigerator before reheating it. Notes * Don’t drain all pasta water: Save some with the pasta to help the pasta sauce adhere to the pasta. The leftover pasta water can be frozen into ice-cube trays and added to stocks and soups. DON’T use it for watering plants if it has salt in it! * Use vegetable stock instead of water to cook the pasta for even more flavor! Nutrition Serving: 1bowl | Calories: 457kcal | Carbohydrates: 93g | Protein: 17g | Fat: 2g | Saturated Fat: 1g | Sodium: 809mg | Potassium: 760mg | Fiber: 6g | Sugar: 10g | Vitamin A: 663IU | Vitamin C: 11mg | Calcium: 44mg | Iron: 3mg

Source: @alphafoodie; Www.Cornonthecob.com

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